Posts Tagged ‘Connie Mack’

Connie Mack’s Days as a Player With The Washington Nationals

by Bob Warrington Introduction Most baseball fans with a sense of history are aware of the legendary managerial career of Connie Mack—the skipper of the Philadelphia Athletics between 1901-50. Less well known is the fact that Mack also had an 11-year career as a major league baseball player in the late 19th century. Generally regarded […]

The Single Toughest Decision Connie Mack Made

by Max Silberman Few men have gained such universal admiration and respect as Connie Mack. His nine pennants and five world’s championships ensured his place in the Hall of Fame. But one decision, so shocking and outrageous at the time, changed the course of baseball history and helped create the last Athletics dynasty.  

Nellie Fox The One That Got Away

by Dale Smith During his 50-year reign as manager of the Philadelphia Athletics, Connie Mack was known for having an uncanny ability to spot potential. Whether on a college diamond, an independent minor league team or through the A’s own farm system, Connie just seemed to know which players were going to have Hall of […]

An Interview with Lum Harris

by Harrington E. Crissey, Jr. (Editor’s note: Local baseball historian Harrington “Kit” Crissey published two volumes of interviews with big league ballplayers in World War II baseball, entitled Teenagers, Graybeards and 4-F’s. The second volume, copyrighted in 1982, featured American League players. Kit has kindly given us permission to reprint from time to time his […]

What Would Have Happened If the War Hadn’t Intervened

By Father Jerome Romanowski aka “The Baseball Padre” Nineteen Forty One could have been the year like 1922 when Connie Mack began to build another winning team. Once the team of that era reached a total of 65 wins, it began a gradual ascent to the top of the American League. The Athletics of 1922 […]

Connie Mack’s Days as a Player With The Washington Nationals

by Bob Warrington Introduction Most baseball fans with a sense of history are aware of the legendary managerial career of Connie Mack—the skipper of the Philadelphia Athletics between 1901-50. Less well known is the fact that Mack also had an 11-year career as a major league baseball player in the late 19th century. Generally regarded […]

The Fight for Sunday Baseball in Philadelphia

by Bob Warrington Introduction The City of Philadelphia’s first legal baseball game between major league teams on a Sunday occurred on April 8, 1934. The hometown exhibition game between the Athletics and Phillies took place at Shibe Park, and 15,000 saw the Phillies win 8-1. George M. Mawhinney of The Philadelphia Inquirer noted that, in […]

Shibe Park’s Grand Opening

By Bob Warrington Introduction When the Philadelphia Athletics were created in 1901 as one of the clubs in the newly formed American League, the team had an immediate need for a ballpark in which to play its home games. Athletics’ Manager Connie Mack found a suitable vacant lot and took out a 10-year lease on […]

WE WUZ’ ROBBED! The Pennant Race of 1907

by Bob Warrington   Connie Mack and his Philadelphia Athletics were involved in many exciting pennant races during their long tenure in the American League (AL). The A’s won nine of those pennants, but of the ones they lost, the 1907 race rankled Mack most deeply. This article describes that contest but focuses primarily on […]